About | Contact | Blog | Home

TWITTER FEED

Join Our Mailing List

Keep up on news and special offers from Q1

Doreen TaylorDoreen Taylor
Sr. Supplier Quality Manager
Haemonetics

 

Doreen Taylor is currently a Sr. Supplier Quality Manager at Haemonetics with global responsibility for Contract Manufacturing and Supplier Quality.

Her former positions include:

• Director of Quality at Medrobotics, responsible for setting up Quality Management System and acquiring ISO13485 certification.
• Sr. Quality Manager at Philips Medical, worked with new medical acquisitions and contract manufacturers to bring them into ISO13485 compliance.
• Black Belt and Lead ISO13485 Auditor

Doreen has received a Master’s Degree from Regis College in Medical Product Regulations and a Masters Certificate in Health Administration. She has also received a BSEE from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and an Operations Management certificate from Northeastern.

 

Doreen will be one of the distinguished speakers at the 6th Semi-Annual Medical Device Supplier Quality Conference: Efficiency, Collaboration & Development.

 

Why is the Medical Device Supplier Quality Conference important for SQA executives?
It is a forum for sharing best practices and emerging regulations.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at this conference?
The new requirements for multiple audits, as our external certification costs are growing exponentially.

 

What supplier quality initiatives are on the horizon for your team in 2017?
We are driving for continuous improvements to drive out non or low value work. Using risk to focus on the most important things.

 

How is your team preparing for the transition to the new ISO 13485:2016?
In-house training and updating our SOPs.

 

How can supplier quality teams better collaborate with suppliers?
Through strategic business reviews and discussions about new product development where we can engage them sooner.

 

Have you recently completed a project that has streamlined your supplier quality practices? If so, give a brief description of the project and its results.
We have utilized system data extractions to load our supplier scorecards versus individually doing these data lookups manually for each supplier. Reducing our time to complete scorecards and improving the accuracy of them, allowing us to focus our time on what needs to be done to create action plans for each supplier that need improvements.

 

Share

A Life Science CEO’s Guide to Success

With trends in healthcare pointing towards an increased emphasis on the patient experience, life science executives are eyeing the benefits and opportunities of embracing patient-centric approaches. Many business leaders are now wondering how, outside of focus groups and surveys, their companies can engage with patients, and what that engagement can do for both the company and the patient. Historically, customer input has been at the center of product innovation. Healthcare is no different. So, with so much at stake, we looked to 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum presenter, Orexigen Therapeutics President and CEO, and PhRMA board member, Michael Narachi. Here are Q1’s takeaways:

Empower the Patient

We all know that knowledge equals power, but how much knowledge are patients really getting about their care options? Most patients don’t get the information they need from pharmaceutical companies to have this power. It’s not because they’re being misdiagnosed or denied these treatments, but, rather, that they just aren’t wholly aware of their options; “The end goal of every product is that they actually make it to the patient, which is rare. Patients don’t get the therapy because they’re not aware of the drug,” Narachi said. So how can the patient perspective empower treatment choices? Simple: incorporate what’s most important. After the clinical phase, many pharmaceutical companies will begin promoting the drug’s performance, but patients themselves are more focused on how they will perform with the drug. Narachi explained, “Patients may mostly care that they can go to work or play a game with their kids.” And engaging this information in product launch can inform a patient of those abilities, enabling them to ask the right questions for themselves.

Grow with the Patient

Those right conversations could help your brand, too. When asked if incorporating the patient perspective into product commercialization could spur business growth, Narachi answered, “Absolutely.” Because many drugs do not make it to the appropriate patient, they tend to be low-performing (unless there is no generic alternative). In Narachi’s words, “[Our] job isn’t done when the FDA approves us.” Incorporating the right, patient ability-focused, post-clinical perspective into product marketing gets the right drug to the right patient, increasing quality of care and brand awareness along the way. In a generic-heavy market, pharmaceutical companies cannot afford to ignore patient-centric growth potential.

Trust the Patient

Pharmaceuticals are similar to other consumer products. They’re chosen based off brand, manufacturer, market performance, and FDA approval. They also appeal to a patient’s trust. Providing thorough and correct information about a product is vital to this trust. Even more so, in 2017, as healthcare shifts further towards patient-centricity, patients are demanding (and receiving) more information about their care; who is providing, manufacturing, and supporting their treatment? “Trust is an important factor to realize –in all brands people buy,” Narachi commented, “but even more important is the information you’re giving to the patient. Patients should move beyond ‘brands,’ and be informing themselves as to the correct treatment for them. Battle the status quo when it comes to your healthcare, and consider the different treatment options and drug attributes that could give you the treatment you really need.” A patient knowing their options and not wholly relying on brand recognition and loyalty could mean the difference between a negative care experience and solving a problem correctly and quickly, which brought Narachi to his last point; the most important aspect of the patient perspective. Narachi explained, “Keep it in mind. The patient is the reason we exist, the reason we do everything we do. It’s critical to remember, even when dreaming of a drug, what problem would it be trying to solve and how would you inform patients about its solutions?” Without the patient perspective, pharmaceuticals may never evolve to be successful for patients, or for businesses.

Patient-centricity is the new norm. Today’s patients are more educated and more empowered about their treatment options.  From product innovation to company growth, inclusion of the patient perspective is quickly becoming an essential driver for life science companies. To hear more from Michael Narachi about the patient perspective in product launch and commercialization, register for the 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum, March 23-24, in San Diego, CA.

Michael A. NarachiMichael Narachi
President and Chief Executive Officer
Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc.

 

Michael A. Narachi has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. and a member of the board of directors since March 2009. In 2004, Mr. Narachi retired as an officer and Vice President of Amgen Inc., a leading therapeutics company, where he served as General Manager of Amgen’s Anemia Business from 1999 through 2003. Mr. Narachi joined Amgen in 1984 and held various US and international positions throughout the organization in Research, Product Development, Corporate Strategy, and Business Development. Mr. Narachi has also served as Chairman or Chief Executive Officer for two private biotechnology companies and one publicly traded company. He currently serves on the board of directors of Celladon Corporation and Ultragenyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., both are publicly traded biotechnology companies. Mr. Narachi received a B.S. in Biology and an M.A. degree in Biology and Genetics from the University of California at Davis. He received an M.B.A. from the Anderson Graduate School of Management at University of California, Los Angeles. Mr. Narachi also currently serves as a member of the Board of Directors of PhRMA, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America; and BIO, the Biotechnology Industry Organization.

 

Michael will be one of the distinguished speakers at the 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum.

 

Why is the 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum important for C-suite executives?
The forum exposes executives to new and different ways of thinking about challenges and opportunities in our industry.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at the forum?
I hope to discuss how to increase productivity of the enterprise.

 

What company initiatives are on the horizon for your team in 2017?
A patient centered campaign for commercialization, and a telemedicine pilot.

 

What do you believe are the 3 biggest factors impacting the life science industry today?
1) The challenges of translating the value of our products to acceptable value extraction methods

2) Getting patients (versus hcp’s or payers) to become more active in making choices for our products

3) Modernizing regulatory frameworks to adapt to 2020’s technology

 

What are the greatest opportunities for life science companies over the next 5 years?
See numbers 1-3 above. Also, technology advances will still drive tremendous innovation opportunities.

 

From a leadership standpoint, where do you draw your inspiration?
The desire to make a meaningful impact on major health care issues – to do something bigger than myself.

 

If you could describe your company in one word, what would that be?
Persistent.

 

 

This Week in the News

Pfizer Releases Biosimilar Data, Rivals J&J

Posted 2/22/17

At the six-week mark of its fifty-four-week study, Pfizer released data for its biosimilar, Inflectra as a treatment for Crohn’s disease. Previously, Inflectra was approved to treat moderate to severe Crohn’s disease but did not have Crohn’s-specific data. With its new data, the biosimilar may be en route to compete with Johnson & Johnson’s Remicade on a global scale. Though the market success of biosimilar drugs still remains reliant upon physician prescription, Pfizer is confident in moving forward with Crohn’s-focused marketing. Read the full article here.

FDA Approves Biotronik Coronary Stent

Posted 2/22/17

Biotronik has received FDA approval for its first bare-metal stent for coronary arteries. The device is intended for patients with new and recurring blockages in the coronary arteries between 2.25 and 4.0 mm in diameter and lesion lengths up to 31 mm. The PRO-Kinetic Energy Cobalt Chromium Bare-Metal Stent was tested in a global trial of 329 patients. The approval is a milestone for Biotronik as the device will be the first U.S. marketing Biotronik coronary stent. Read the full statement here.

3D Printed Prosthetics Changing Medical Device Landscape

Posted 2/22/17

Due to cost, efficiency, and shorter time frames, many companies have begun printing prosthetics. The devices, used among children and adults alike, have found niche markets in underprivileged countries as the cost of traditional prosthetics rises. Many are claiming that the ability to re-print and re-design the prosthetics in shorter amounts of time enables children to grow with the devices at a less costly rate than being fitted for traditionally engineered limbs, and signals healthcare trends for the future. Read the full article here.

Artificial Intelligence Spotting Skin Cancer

Posted 2/22/17

Researchers from Stanford University have taken AI to the next level, turning computers into dermatologists, or, at least, basic skin cancer detectors. Through an image recognition algorithm, the computer program was able to detect a form of melanoma just as well as a group of dermatologists, suggests one study. The software may be available for public use in the future, as the researchers hope to one day enable smartphones to detect cancerous skin lesions as well. Read the full article here.

Johnson & Johnson Tops Fortune’s 2017 Most Admired Pharma for Fourth Year

Posted 2/22/17

For the fourth year running, Johnson & Johnson has been named as the top most-admired pharmaceutical company of 2017. In a statement about the honor, Johnson & Johnson cited a strong desire to put the consumer first. The top five most-admired pharma companies include Novartis, Roche, Merck, and Amgen. J&J was also included in Fortune’s Top 50 All Stars of 2017. See Fortune’s Most Admired Companies list here.

Joerg PantermollerJoerg Pantermoller
Director of Supplier Quality Management
BIOTRONIK

Currently engaged as the Director of Supplier Quality Management at BIOTRONIK, with global responsibility for suppliers of components, materials & services in the cardiac rhythm management business. Involved in Strategic Supplier Selection, Supplier Qualification as well as Monitoring.

Former positions include various responsibilities in the automotive industry like the FIAT Group as well as in the Supplier´s industry, like ZF Friedrichshafen, one of the TOP 3 Suppliers the Delivery of transmission system and various others. Setup of Quality Management Systems, Involvement in Strategic Product Development and Supplier Management were the major challenges to overcome.

Joerg has a Diploma in Mechanical Engineering, made at the Technical University in Berlin, and a MBA in Entrepreneurial Business Management, made at the Institute of Management in Berlin.

 

Joerg will be one of the distinguished presenters at the 5th Semi-Annual Medical Device Supplier Quality Conference.

 

Why is the Medical Device Supplier Quality Conference important for SQA executives?
The MDSQC is important as the WHO is WHO of the industry related to Supplier Management Topics will meet and discuss current topics as well as future trends. It’s one of the best meetings in the world to exchange information and understand expectations and trends of the industry.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at this conference?
I hope to discuss challenges that we are facing at our company in the near future and get a best practice approach from the experts at the MDSQC, very much related to the expectation of the new ISO 13485.

 

What supplier quality initiatives are on the horizon for your team in 2017?
Various, from partnership models to support innovation up to the implementation of lean concepts of supply management as well as performance optimization.

 

How is your team preparing for the transition to the new ISO 13485:2016?
We are getting trained on the new ISO and will have internal programs to adapt the organization to the new standard.

 

How can supplier quality teams better collaborate with suppliers?
First, respect them as an integrative partner and acknowledge their capabilities to support the manufacturer to be as close as possible to customer needs. Second, develop programs exactly with that mindset and drive regular partnership models which are targeting the collaboration. The knowledge of the individual challenges will drive ideas for improvements and supports getting procedures streamlined as well as developing input for improvements.

 

Erica SmithErica Smith
Administrative Assistant
Cisco

 

As a bright and efficient business professional, Erica Smith embodies quality executive leadership and support within the corporate arena. With a primary focus on executive support, event planning, and interactive team management she defines resourcefulness. These skills have afforded her prestigious opportunities as an Executive Assistant for Chief Executive Officers, Chief Financial Officers, Chief Operating Officers, and various executive management teams. She has utilized her talents within high growth Fortune 100 organizations including Cbeyond, Lancope, and Cisco. Today, she continues to assist several members of the executive team and direct reports throughout internal projects and daily tasks at Cisco, one of the nation’s leading technology companies.

 

Erica will be one of the distinguished presenters at the Executive Leadership Support Forum: Atlanta.

 

Why is the Executive Leadership Support Forum: Atlanta important for executive assistants?
The forum is a powerful networking opportunity that promotes growth by showcasing the successes and learning opportunities of EA’s, while reinforcing the importance of the role they play as partners to an organizations leadership.

 

Independently, what have you done to work towards professional development in the past?
Online learning courses in the Microsoft Office Suite and continuing education in Oracle and SharePoint.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at the ELS Forum?
Strategies to more effectively manage multiple executives through the use of new or emerging tools, apps or processes. I’m also interested to grow my support network and find opportunities to educate EA’s just starting out.

 

In your mind, what is one tool you can’t live without or find especially helpful in your position?
In my current role, I have found SmartSheets to be extremely helpful especially sharing information with teams that are all over the world.

 

Looking back, what advice would you give yourself when you were first starting your career?
It’s okay to make mistakes as long as you learn from them. Keep an open mind, have fun and be proactive.

 

Are there any blogs, books, articles or online forums you recommend reading?
Book: The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni
Blogs: Office Dynamics, All Things Admin

 

Eric SteenEric Steen
Chief Executive Officer
InfuSystem Holdings, Inc.

 

Eric K. Steen is the President and CEO of InfuSystem Holdings Inc. (NYSE – INFU), a leading provider and supplier of infusion pumps and services.  Previously, Mr. Steen served on the Management Board of B. Braun Medical North America (2004 – 2012).  As its Chief Marketing Officer, Mr. Steen was the primary commercial officer for B.Braun’s $1.5 billion medical device, pharmaceutical, and services organizations.  While Senior Vice President of Sales at B.Braun, operating income grew by $90 million.  Mr. Steen also led a B.Braun-owned company (Central Admixture Pharmacy Services), growing from a fledgling start-up company to having $150 million in sales.

 

Eric will be one of the distinguished speakers at the 8th Annual Life Science Chief Executive Officer Forum.

 

Why is the 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum important for C-suite executives?
To learn is to grow. It is important to get out of the weeds and take a look at the bigger picture including the current trends and issues in the rapidly evolving Life Sciences industry.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at the forum ?
A key strategic initiative at InfuSystem is connecting electronically with our provider customers. I am interesting to learn what others are doing and discussing how the platforms that we have developed for our Oncology, Home Infusion, Surgical and Long Term Care customers might be leveraged by new partners.

 

What company initiatives are on the horizon for your team in 2017?
Our number one initiative in 2017 is to leverage the Information Technology investments we have made through redesigned work flows and growing our  targeted segments though our automated Electronic Medical Records integration, asset tracking and inventory management system, web portal for equipment life cycle management, on-line ordering for hospitals, physician practices and direct to patient and physician/clinician dashboard for patient metrics including capturing pain scores for HCAHPS.

 

What do you believe are the 3 biggest factors impacting the life science industry today?
Payor perception and reimbursement trends both commercial and government.
Compliance with regulations be they FDA, CMS, JACHO, State Boards of Pharmacy and Health and the list goes on and on. Recruitment, retention and development of talent.

 

What are the greatest opportunities for life science companies over the next 5 years?
Genomics/biomarkers, Connecting the stakeholders through Information Technology and advancements in prevention as a healthcare cost reduction strategy.

 

From a leadership standpoint, where do you draw your inspiration?
Healthcare is an industry that is naturally inspiring, if you can’t go to work every morning being energized by participating in work that returns people to health, save lives and increases the quality of life you may not be focused on the right things.

 

If you could describe your company in one word, what would that be?
I can’t do it in one word, but our brand promise is “Infusion Made Easy” and that sums things up pretty well in three words.

  

Dr. David MazzoDavid Mazzo
CEO
Caladrius Biosciences

  

Dr. Mazzo is the CEO of Caladrius Biosciences, a public cell therapy therapeutics development company. He is a pharmaceutical executive and strategic leader with >30 years of broad international experience. He is also a seasoned board director having served on the boards of all the companies for which he was CEO plus Essex Chimie AG (EU subsidiary of Schering-Plough), Avanir Pharmaceuticals and pSivida, Inc. Dr. Mazzo earned a Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry and an M.S. in Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts (Amherst). He also holds a B.S.(Chemistry) and a B.A. (Honors-Interdisciplinary Humanities) from Villanova University.

  

David will be one of the distinguished speakers at the 8th Annual Life Science Chief Executive Officer Forum.

  

Why is the 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum important for C-suite executives? 
The opportunity to interact with peers, to share best practices and to discuss common challenges is reason alone to attend the Forum.

  

What company initiatives are on the horizon for your team in 2017? 
Our company, during 2017, will be looking to expand clinical indications, advance our existing clinical programs, pursue strategic partnerships and continue to create shareholder value.

  

What do you believe are the 3 biggest factors impacting the life science industry today? 
Drug pricing continues to loom large as a critical issue for life science companies, especially for those of us working in the areas of cell and gene therapies.  Additionally, the evolving regulatory environment and the fickle capital markets are challenges that will continue to impact our industry.

  

What are the greatest opportunities for life science companies over the next 5 years? 
The ability to influence on the final implementation of the 21st Century Cures Act and to bring advanced new therapies to market safely, quickly and cost-effectively is a great opportunity.

  

From a leadership standpoint, where do you draw your inspiration?
Personally,  my inspiration comes from a combination of family values and example, great leaders for whom I’ve worked in the past and the people in our company, whose dedication, creativity and tenacity never cease to amaze me.

   

Cynthia HarrisCynthia Harris
Virtual Executive Assistant
CHarrisVirtual Assistant

 

Cynthia has been an assistant since 1981, supporting senior leaders in industries such as: university, banking, corporate and matrimonial law, human resources, accounting, transit, health insurance, housing, retail, entertainment and telecommunications in NY, NJ and NC. She has always worked in a fast paced and demanding environment, which keeps her attention at peak levels. She is passionate about her role, ensuring that her executives are supported to align and anticipate their needs for the unexpected. Cynthia now brings her dedicated support services as a virtual executive assistant, which continues to propel her out of her comfort zone with this exciting endeavor. It continues to reflect her passion to devote her time and skills assisting busy professionals.

 

Cynthia will be one of the distinguished presenters at the Executive Leadership Support Forum: Raleigh-Durham.

 

Why is the Executive Leadership Support Forum important for executive assistants?
Many of us communicate with each other, sometimes daily, without the opportunity of ever meeting face-to-face.  This forum presents an excellent  opportunity to bridge that void, collaborate experiences while applying some of the potential solutions and forming long-term bond/professional friendships.

 

Independently, what have you done to work towards professional development in the past?
Seeking a mentor that truly cares about my success.  Always researching tools, videos, webinars and forums to enhance my strengths and strengthen my weaknesses.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at the ELS Forum?
Other tools/software to share with clients.

 

Tell us about a career accomplishment of which you’re particularly proud.
There are a few that come to mind; however, my first project management role outside of my routine responsibilities and area of comfort was to successfully facilitate the relocation of our department from one corporate campus to another.

 

In your mind, what is one tool you can’t live without or find especially helpful in your position?
I may be lost without Microsoft Office.

 

Looking back, what advice would you give yourself when you were first starting your career?
It would be to remain cognizant:  Family First – Always!  And as always, that out of all situations, only good will come and is easily resolved for the highest good of all concerned.

 

Are there any blogs, books, articles or online forums you recommend reading?
There are so many to choose, however via LinkedIn: Entrepreneurship, Professional Women, Learning Solutions, Company Culture, EA – Groups; Bruce Kasanoff and J.T. O’Donnell, to name a few.

 

How do you define success within your role as an executive assistant?
Consistently, remain present and serene in everything that you do as you are always held to a higher standard in performance and skills.  Seeking ways or solutions to streamline projects, assignments and day-to-day activities seamlessly in our changing environment.  Ensure trusted partnerships at all levels; however, most importantly with your executive.

 

 

 

This Week in the News

Merck to Begin Testing Alzheimer’s Treatment Theory

Posted 2/15/17

Merck & Co. announced this week plans to begin testing a possible cause of Alzheimer’s. The testing is commencing after 200 patients were reviewed for three months while taking MK-8931, an experimental Merck drug which reduces a side effect of the illness. The testing will involve over 3000 patients and with continue for up to 2 years. If successful, the testing may culminate in the first available Alzheimer’s treatment. Read the full article here.

Medical Device Industry Fighting Tax to Save Jobs

Posted 2/15/17

In 2015, the medical device industry claimed that nearly 33,000 jobs had been lost since 2012 due to the Affordable Care Act’s device tax of 2.3%. Though former President Barak Obama signed a bill halting the tax for two years, the industry is fighting to have the tax permanently repealed. Leaders are expecting to regain the 7.2% of medical device workforce lost in the three years of the tax’s implementation with two new bills which both seek to permanently repeal the tax. Read the full article here.

Aurobindo Pharma Reveals Plans for U.S. Production

Posted 2/15/17

Following President Trump’s meeting with pharmaceutical executives this month, many foreign drug makers have begun planning production sites in the United States. Aurobindo Pharma, an Indian pharmaceutical company is one of these foreign drug makers interested in following Trump’s call to action. Already running one production facility, the pharmaceutical company has plans to locate its second U.S. site near the first in New Jersey. Read the full article here.

Marathon Pharmaceutical Delays DMD Drug Launch

Posted 2/15/17

The same day congressional voiced aired concern over Marathon’s $89,000 price of a decades-old Duchenne Muscular Disorder treatment, EMFLAZA (deflazacort), Marathon’s CEO released a statement Monday citing that the company is pausing their “commercialization efforts.” Noting a steep price difference between EMFLAZA and its generic, lawmakers were first to criticize the brand which did not develop the drug. Marathon’s statement indicates that it will reinvest any earnings from EMFLASA into continual Duchenne research. Read the full article here.

Incyte Acquires Right to Antibody Development from Agenus

Posted 2/15/17

In 2015, Incyte and Agenus both agreed to work on developing and commercializing antibodies GITR and GX40. In a statement early this week, however, the two have announced plans for Incyte to retain rights to solely develop and commercialize the drugs, profits from which could exceed $350 million. Agenus cited streamlined development as the reason for Incyte’s takeover. Agenus will receive a $20 million payout along with %15 of royalties if the antibodies are successful at market. Read the full statement here.

Robert L. GershonGershon
Chief Executive Officer
BOVIE MEDICAL

 

Robert L. Gershon, CEO and Director of Bovie Medical Corporation, has over 28 years of healthcare industry experience. Under his leadership Bovie Medical has increased its market cap from $37M to $150M. On the operations side he ran the largest sales and marketing business at Covidien. With over $1B in P&L responsibility he consistently led an organization of over 600 people to double-digit revenue growth outpacing market category growth and capturing significant market share points during challenging healthcare economic conditions. He also was VP of sales and marketing at Henry Schein ($1.4B shared P&L for medical division/$115M full P&L for dialysis division) and earlier in his career spent over 13 years as a healthcare consultant for Booz, Allen, KPMG and two boutique consultancies where his practice focused on strategic planning, business development and mergers and acquisitions. Mr. Gershon received an MBA from J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and a BSBA degree from American University.

 

Robert will be one of the distinguished speakers at the 8th Annual Life Science Chief Executive Officer Forum.

 

Why is the 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum important for C-suite executives?
Anytime a large number of C-Suite healthcare executives can come together in one location it presents a wonderful forum to share insights.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at the forum?
Gain an understanding of common opportunities and challenges other C-Suite executives are facing and share insights.

 

What company initiatives are on the horizon for your team in 2017?
New product launches, business development activities, product rationalization, talent acquisition.

 

What do you believe are the 3 biggest factors impacting the life science industry today?

  1. Continued cost-containment
  2. Repeal of Affordable Care Act
  3. Industry-wide consolidation

 

What are the greatest opportunities for life science companies over the next 5 years?
Launching of “must have” transformational technologies and robotics

 

From a leadership standpoint, where do you draw your inspiration?
Prospect of improving patient outcomes through arming surgeons with transformational technologies

 

If you could describe your company in one word, what would that be?
Growth

 

 

 

Increasing Compliance Training Engagement with Steven Sitek

The complexities of a growing global market, changing pricing structures, and healthcare reforms have placed added pressure on the life science industry to modernize training programs. Compliance training professionals are looking for inventive opportunities to engage employees and increase knowledge retention. Much of this innovation comes from the introduction of new technology, positive reinforcement, and audience segmentation. In an effort to really understand life science compliance training engagement, I spoke with Steven Sitek, Head of Learning, Education & Communications, Ethics & Compliance of Novartis Pharmaceuticals and keynote speaker for this year’s Life Science Compliance Training Conference. Sitek, a recognized leader in the field of learning and organization development, has facilitated global transformational change at well-known companies including: Sony, GE, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Ernst & Young, and more. So, when it comes to life science compliance training, how can we effectively engage an audience?

Balance Techniques

Technology is quickly becoming a normal method of training, being personalized and helping trainers easily identify trainees who are having difficulty moving through the material. Sitek identified this in his own experience, “technology is a necessity, now, when it comes to compliance training. Especially for large groups of people, sometimes the only way to reach them all is to use a webinar or eLearning.” Even more helpful is the introduction of gamification, or, the introduction of game-like qualities in compliance training. Not only does this assimilate compliance material into the 21st century “game-at-your-fingertips” lifestyle, but it helps trainees get competitive and want to understand the rules and regulations offered. “People like it,” explained Sitek, “it’s new, and not your father’s compliance training. It’s brought a refreshing edge to the content.” For all its ease, however, technology is not always the preferred method of trainers. Sometimes, you just need an expert. Rather, “the face-to-face expert interaction of a live setting,” explained Sitek. Though training with technology is quickly becoming the norm, Sitek believes that it’s not always the best way to train. If you rely too heavily on technology, some trainees may be left behind.

Tailor Content

An important aspect of compliance training is that it’s not all about how you train people, but the information you’re presenting. When asked how to effectively engage a varied audience, Sitek offered the solution of segmentation. By accurately tailoring training content so that the recipient will see the everyday value in learning it, trainees engage themselves; “Tailor the content,” says Sitek, “make sure it’s relevant. One challenge of compliance training is that the training is required, so large audiences may be harder to engage if the information doesn’t directly impact them.” And, for some audiences, segmentation and engagement may be easier if training is reinforced throughout the year, “Training year round helps prepare people for training engagement; it reinforces the idea and helps people ease into the mindset when the requirement is presented,” says Sitek.

Build Confidence

Utilizing positive reinforcement and positive training content helps Sitek connect training information to daily activities. Says Sitek, “We don’t want people to just remember the consequences of not following compliance, we want people to build confidence in their understanding of the rules and help them apply that confidence to the decisions they need to make in a regular day.” Rather than shocking audiences with compliance horror stories, Sitek chooses to focus on what good can come from correct compliance and following regulations. “Involve contextual scenarios,” recommends Sitek, “and help them assimilate the rules into their days.” Positivity is refreshing course of action for Sitek who remembers when compliance training was mostly filled with stories of compliance gone wrong, but with these stories it was difficult to really engage contextual learning. If trainees are only learning consequence and not building confidence, their training may not have a lasting effect.

Keep it Fresh

When asked what he thought was the biggest challenge of compliance training, Sitek answered “Keeping the content fresh.” Training large audiences on life science compliance comes with the downfall that training never really comes at the perfect time, “making sure everyone is focusing and engaging with the material is key.” This is why Sitek recommends revitalizing content so that “large numbers of people know and appreciate the rules.” And there are always new compliance issues to train. Global and domestic regulations can change quickly, and knowing how to remedy new information with tested training practices can help an audience engage quickly and stay engaged longer.

The life science industry changes daily and can be somewhat unpredictable, but training doesn’t need to be. Steven Sitek is the Head of Learning, Ethics & Compliance, at Novartis Pharmaceuticals. To hear more from Steven Sitek about compliance training engagement, register for the 2nd Annual Life Science Compliance Training Conference, May 4-5, in Chicago, IL.

Session Three: Post Launch through Life Cycle Management

Everywhere you turn, you hear about patient centricity. Healthcare consumers now have unprecedented access to information, and they expect their perspectives to be heard, respected and acted upon. How can biopharma listen to the experiences of customers and internalize them throughout the organization to create better products and services, better engagement and adherence, and relationships that last? The questions in this Q&A were submitted by attendees of the session one: Early Stage through Clinical Development

Session 1: Early Stage through Clinical Development  (See Q&A here)
Session 1 focuses on early-stage drug through clinical drug development. How can biopharma create a seat at the table for patients and patient advocacy groups? Topics covered include:

  • When is the right time to bring in patients?
  • Patient impact on trial design
  • Examples
  • How to guide
  • Key compliance considerations
  • The long term impact of early relationship building

Session 2: Pre-launch to Launch Commercial Efforts (See Q&A here)
Session 2 focuses on pre-launch through commercialization, digging into the strategic and operational elements that need to be in place to incorporate patients during this dynamic timeframe. Topics covered include:

  • Best practices for including patients in prelaunch and launch strategies
  • Two way relationships vs. traditional DTC push campaigns
  • Launch and pre-launch case studies
  • Patient relationships and insurers
  • The impact of technology on patient relationships; social media, mobile and other new channels
  • Metrics for patient programs – it can be done
  • Compliance in patient engagement activities


Session 3: Post Launch through Life Cycle Management

Session 3 focuses on post-launch through the life cycle management of products, looking at the long-term impact patient centricity can have on health outcomes and brand loyalty. Topics covered include:

  • Building strong long-term ongoing relationships
  • Long term impact on adherence
  • Expanding patient relationships into outcomes results
  • How to expand and connect your relationships for future products
  • What happens with relationships post-patent
  • Compliance over the long haul
  • How relationship building stands the test of time

Speakers:
Cheryl Lubbert
President, CEO, and Co-owner
Health Perspectives Group

Pam Garfield
Senior Vice President, Strategy and Innovation
Patient Health Perspectives

Jean McCoy
Senior Vice President, Strategy & Innovation
Health Advocacy Strategies

Participants that will find this webinar most beneficial will be those involved in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Job titles of attendees that will be most applicable for this session will be:

  • Patient Advocacy
  • Patient Education
  • Patient Communications

See this week’s top headlines:

Allergan Fights Preventable Blindness

Posted 2/8/17

After unveiling “See America,” this week, Allergen has spoken out about its commitment to fighting preventable blindness in America. The company will be partnering with Prevent Blindness, a health organization dedicated to promoting eye-health information. The two will host vision screenings in different cities across the country, presenting the opportunity for people to have a one-on-one discussion about their vision with a vision-health professional. The company is also said to be partnering with celebrity ambassadors, but the specific persons have yet to be named. Read the full article here.

Roche to Expand Diabetes Sector

Posted 2/8/17

Following reports of Johnson & Johnson selling their diabetes division, Roche has announced plans to expand and innovate their diabetes business. This innovation comes with plans to partner with smaller companies to offer more device options. Roland Digglemann, head of diagnostics, said in interview with Reuters, “We’re looking around: Are there new possibilities, are there alternatives?” An emerging market for Roche, as of late, has come from China, where an estimated 100 million people may be living with diabetes. Read the full article here.

 

Trump Confirms Medicare Drug Price Negotiations

Posted 2/8/17

After meeting with drug makers last week, President Trump has returned to his former claim of Medicare drug negotiations. In a Tuesday morning press brief, Whitehouse Spokesman, Sean Spicer, claimed that, yes, Trump is a proponent of Medicare negotiations. This claim is a sharp turn from last week’s meeting where President Trump made claims of working with pharmaceutical companies to reduce drug prices. Read the full article here.

 

Tarveda Raises Phase 2 Funding of Pentarin

Posted 2/8/17

Tarveda Therapeutics has gained $30 million in funding for pentarin second phase clinical trials through new investor, Versant Ventures. The funding will enable the pharmaceutical company to continue developing the newest cancer treatment which combines tumor targeting with reduced drug sizing, allowing them to penetrate more deeply into cancers.  Testing data is expected to be available sometime this year. Read the full article here.

 

Mylan, Teva Agree to $96.5M Settlement

Posted 2/8/17

A decade after the suit was filed claiming pharmaceutical companies Mylan and Teva conspired to stall generic narcolepsy medication Provigil, a settlement has been reached. Plaintiffs in the suit argued that the companies engaged in “unlawful reverse payment agreements,” causing Provigil overpayment and boosting their own sales. A spokesperson for Mylan said of the settlement, “Nothing in the settlement agreement constitutes an admission of wrongdoing … the proposed settlement is in the best interests of the company and is an important step in moving forward.” This settlement is the latest in a string of legal issues for Mylan, including an EpiPen pricing controversy and extensive layoffs. Read the full article here.

David Millsdavid
President & CEO
Dallen Medical

 

David Mills is the President & CEO of Dallen Medical Inc., a venture backed orthopedic company. Mr. Mills has approximately 25 years in the industry. Prior to Dallen, David founded Harper & Associates, a healthcare consulting company specializing in start-ups and early stage medical devices. David was also the Director of Business Development Marketing & Sales for American Immuno Tech, developers of the Neptune Waste Management System, which was acquired by the Stryker Corporation and is now a $200M product-line. David was also an Area Director for Denver Biomedical which was acquired by Cardinal Health. David earned a B.S. in Business Administration from Miami University, Oxford, OH in 1984 and is a member of OCTANe, an Orange County Technology and Angel Network.

 

David will be one of the distinguished speakers at the 8th Annual Life Science Chief Executive Officer Forum.

 

Why is the 8th Annual Life Science CEO Forum important for C-suite executives?
To stay in tune with the ever evolving marketplace, to see new opportunities and the obstacles that will inevitably present themselves to these opportunities.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at the forum?
In today’s world of “big talking to big”, i.e. the major distribution companies locking start-ups out with contracts and more red-tape, how will start-ups need to evolve to survive?

 

What company initiatives are on the horizon for your team in 2017?
Dallen consummated a deal with Zimmer Biomet and our goal now is to expand the product-line and be the best manufacturing partner for them as possible.

 

What do you believe are the 3 biggest factors impacting the life science industry today?
Lack of capital and lack of a free market, note comment above, overly burdensome regulatory environment.

 

What are the greatest opportunities for life science companies over the next 5 years?
Big data.

 

From a leadership standpoint, where do you draw your inspiration?
My peers.

 

 

 

Redefining the Pre-Launch MSL

Recent changes to healthcare have dictated equal and necessary changes to the product launch process. As the healthcare industry shifts towards patient-centered care, new standards have been placed on the way pharmaceutical companies should be presenting their research and products. Payers and patients are becoming more involved in the amount of information and quality of care provided, and pharmaceutical companies are beginning to feel it.

Now, Medical Science Liaisons (MSL) are needed more than ever to support the product where the pharmaceutical companies can’t –with physicians, or, Key Opinion Leaders (KOL). The increasing difficulty of a pharmaceutical company approaching a physician for endorsement, pre-launch, has led to companies relying on the relationship between Medical Affairs and MSLs.

Though the role of the MSL is nothing new, the recent boom in MSL positions is a sign that they’re rapidly becoming vital. In 2015, it was predicted that MSL positions would increase by 20% by 2017. This is a surge which begs the question: If the MSL has always been a key factor in the pre-launch process, then why the sudden boom? Simply put: KOL requests.

Physicians are adamant that MSLs are key players in their endorsement of a product. This is largely credited to the many channels the MSL is now tasked with representing. Not only does the KOL desire scientific support for the product, they want to know the real-world outcome or the patient’s experience. In this way, MSLs not only act as company liaisons and living scientific publications, but also patient advocates. Incorporating the patient experience not only advocates beneficial and streamlined health, but it also appeals to the payer, increasing the chance of payer reimbursement.

It’s no secret that early payer engagement and interest is vital in a product’s post-launch success. But just how important are the different representations? Robert Groebel of Veeva Systems explains, “An effective MSL strategy will look at segmenting MSL teams to address all key stakeholders that can affect a brand’s success. It will also need to ensure that MSLs are carefully aligned across all customer-facing teams and channels to help nurture existing KOL relationships and build new customers across markets.” MSLs are tasked with taking scientific exchange and not only delivering it for a KOL, but also filtering the scientific exchange and patient perspective into a narrative of quality, valuable care that is consistently bettering itself, requiring MSLs to have a scientific background and a current perspective of healthcare needs and desires.

The numbers don’t lie. KOLs are onboard with this multi-representation, and nowhere in the product launch process is this more important than pre-launch, “Positive positioning at the pre- and post-launch phase of a product is the top priority of medical science liaisons and is achieved through sustained interactions with [KOLs],” explains Jane Chin, PhD, of the MSL Institute. By gaining early endorsement, reimbursement, and positive thought leadership, pharmaceutical companies are laying the groundwork for extremely successful product launches – a true feat in such a competitive market. So, then, how can the MSL role be accurately defined? Somewhere between marketing, research & development, and representation, the MSL is finding their niche –and it’s only getting bigger.

 

 

 

Tiffany Westrich-Robertson tiff2
CEO
IFAA

 

Tiffany Westrich-Robertson is the CEO of IFAA, an International Foundation for Autoimmune & Autoinflammatory diseases with Arthritis as a major component, and is also a patient living with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Axial Spondylitis. She is a former educator, Vice President in charge of project management and business development, and has been active in the patient research collaboration arena since 2010. Tiffany has reviewed grants for the American Institute for Biologic Sciences, PCORI, and currently serves as the sole patient reviewer for National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases (NIAMS). In addition, she previously worked as a qualitative research assistant and has taken courses in both quantitative and qualitative methods. Currently she serves as project lead and patient-researcher liaison for IFAA’s 2015 Innovation in Research Award: A Community Team (ACT), designed to test unique collaboration methods to unite patients with researchers in industry so better outcomes can be achieved and research dollars better spent. The project is evolving in 2017 to establish the first global Patient Research Partnership (PRP) Leadership Groups, which aim to log past and current PRP successes so those in this environment can build on existing efforts and refrain from duplicating them – thus resulting in wasted time and money.

 

Tiffany will be one of the distinguished speakers at the 2nd Annual Patient Centric Clinical Research: Engagement & Innovation Conference.

 

Why is the Patient Centric Clinical Research Conference important to clinical research professionals?
There are many groups (nonprofits, research institutes, etc) who recognize the benefits (cost, time savings), but a strong fear for some clinical research professionals re: engagement themselves involves a lack of understanding the benefits. Some barriers they typically cite include:

  • Not enough money in budget to include patients
  • Not enough time to train them to be able to participate
  • Have no idea who to engage/where to find these patients

Attending this could help some move past these barriers (as they find answers from panels and participants).

 

What initiatives are on the horizon at your organization towards patient centricity in 2017?
IFAA just wrapped up our initial pilot project, which was one of three winners in Celgene’s Innovation in Research awards. In this project we successfully developed a platform to engage not only the existing patient advocate (or patient who serves on panels/projects most often) to be inclusive of all patients from anywhere in the world and regardless of disability…they only need to speak English and have access to the internet. We also tested patient leadership on research projects, with advisors in place to ensure processes were completed correctly. We not only had patients as focus group moderators, but we also had me (a patient) on the analysis team – and I was able to identify things the expert analyst couldn’t because I could speak the language of the respondents (something software can’t pick up on). Moving into 2017, we are advancing this project to include more patient groups, we will be teaming with the National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases – who will be designing, building AND STORING the ACT databank – and together we will conduct longevity studies to develop “Typical Atypical” subgroups of patients and work towards better understanding decision drivers as it relates to treatments and adherence. We also are establishing the first global ‘coalition’ (called PRP Leadership Groups) that will unite major groups around the world so we can share our past and current successes in PRP. Then IFAA will chart these and create a master log to share between members. This will enable groups working in patient research partnerships to understand what has worked previously, what didn’t, and can use the previous projects to build on instead of duplicating efforts (which just wastes time and energy). IFAA, Arthritis Consumer Experts/Joint Health, and Arthritis Research Canada will be leading this in North America and EULAR in Europe.

 

How has patient centricity evolved in the last several years?
In 2009 industry started reaching out to patient advocates to interview us. At the time, we were just happy to be heard so we all did this for free. Then we started realizing our voice was valuable and demanded pay for our testimonies. By 2013 it became the norm to pay a patient for their time and responses. It also has become standard to include at least a patient as an advisor on industry drug development work and on grant review panels, but it’s still lacking when it’s past the ‘advisory’ position. That’s where IFAA comes in, we are shaking things up by testing collaboration methods not done before. Once we can join forces (see #2, IFAA’s coalition), we can have enough project work to have professionals analyze outcomes so we can finally show measured value (the #1 thing missing right now that prevents researchers and industry from getting on the band wagon).

 

What is your favorite social media platform for being more patient centric? Why?
Facebook, patients can easily engage and share stories.

 

What kind of content or communication do you believe sparks a patients interest? 
Any time a patient can learn from others what they are doing about disease management (so patient engagement as a group in a project). So content that evokes discussions how others handle a situation.

 

When it comes to reaching different demographics of your patients, which sector(s) will you be paying more attention to in 2017?
We will be focusing on understanding and establishing “Typical Atypical” subgroups, or those who don’t meet the norm for inclusion criteria in clinical trials.

 

If you had to describe your patients in one word, what would it be?
Empowered.

 

 

 

Krister CrommKC
Head of Patient Experience
FRESENIUS MEDICAL CARE

 

Krister is a specialist in intercultural management, market research and health psychology with a focus on patient-reported outcomes of chronic patients. Over the past seven years, Krister has led the gradual implementation of such activities within Fresenius Medical Care, the world’s largest provider of products and services for dialysis patients. This included projects on patient personality, resilience and health-related quality of life in Australia and Taiwan, as well as patient-reported factors contributing to hospitalization and mortality in the US. He is currently working on the development of a wide array of surveys that help patients communicate what they need and value to payers and providers. This includes projects showing the important connection between patient satisfaction and outcomes, added-value activities such as exercise promotion, and development of surveys for patients with lesser-known diseases such as familial hypercholesterolemia.

 

Krister will be one of the distinguished presenters at the 8th Annual EU Medical Device and Diagnostic Reimbursement and Market Access Conference.

 

How many years have you been in the industry?
Over seven years.

 

What trends or regulatory shifts have most impacted your role in the past 5 to 10 years?
The gradual integration of patient-reported outcomes in decision-making.

 

Why do you believe that the Q1 8th EU Device & Diagnostic Reimbursement & Market Access Conference is important?
It brings together leaders to join positive change and innovation.

 

Which session(s) from this program are you most looking forward to attending?
All presentations on value-based healthcare and mHealth.

 

What do you hope attendees will take away from your presentation, workshop or panel discussion?
That it’s worth it to engage with patients directly in a structured and committed way.

 

What inspires your passion and/or interest for medical technology reimbursement & market access and/or healthcare?
Knowing that my contribution makes a difference to real people in the real world.

 

 

 

Kara WilsonWilson
Executive Assistant to VP of Development
The Cadillac Fairview Corporation LTD.

 

Kara has over ten years of experience in administrative support roles with progressively increasing responsibility starting in frontline roles like reception to providing support to more senior executives. This has culminated in her current role as Executive Assistant, Development at the Cadillac Fairview Corp. Through these roles, Kara has successfully been able to balance meeting and exceeding the demanding requirements of supporting senior executives while maintaining her commitment to family and personal priorities. This has required Kara to develop a strong work ethic coupled with an understanding of the business that is required to effectively prioritize tasks and anticipate the needs of the executives. Her proactive approach, positive attitude and demeanor, together with being a committed team player has led to her becoming a valued and trusted assistant who is frequently asked to take on additional complex tasks including financial budget tracking for multi-million dollar capital development projects and the coordination of nation-wide corporate training programs.

 

Kara will be one of the distinguished presenters at the Executive Leadership Support Forum: Toronto.

 

Why is the Executive Leadership Support Forum: Toronto important for executive assistants?
I feel it’s important to be exposed to other individuals who can provide insight and advice on how to handle the situation that we all face in our roles, you can’t expect to do better if you don’t know better and the best way is to ask questions.

 

Independently, what have you done to work towards professional development in the past?
I have always maintained good relationships and open communication with my former managers – this has proved to be extremely valuable in making decisions and certain career choices because I receive unbiased perspectives and frank/honest opinions from individuals who have extensive experience in various industries- they’ve seen it all.

 

What is one thing you hope to learn or discuss with your peers at the ELS Forum?
How they have handled life balance as their careers have progressed (I’m still quite new to all of this!)

 

Tell us about a career accomplishment of which you’re particularly proud.
The pace of my progression at Cadillac Fairview that came from my demonstration of a very clear and direct work ethic without compromising my personal values.

 

In your mind, what is one tool you can’t live without or find especially helpful in your position?
Beer (just kidding). I would say pens that don’t smear, its hard enough deciphering people’s handwriting without the ink smudging everywhere! Using basic communication avenues like texting or Google hangouts, really help get the answers you need without necessarily causing a major interruption, and my task manager in my calendar.

 

Looking back, what advice would you give yourself when you were first starting your career?
Learn how to say NO earlier, its hard when you’re young and in a new position to know not to do everyone’s work for them, be responsible for your own role not everybody else’s.

 

How do you define success within your role as an executive assistant?
Doing what I can to support and push for my manager’s work/life balance while maintaining my own. It’s good to remember if THEY have a balance, they’re much more likely to give you your’s.

 

 

 

Session Two: Pre-launch to Launch Commercial Efforts

Everywhere you turn, you hear about patient centricity. Healthcare consumers now have unprecedented access to information, and they expect their perspectives to be heard, respected and acted upon. How can biopharma listen to the experiences of customers and internalize them throughout the organization to create better products and services, better engagement and adherence, and relationships that last? The questions in this Q&A were submitted by attendees of the session one: Early Stage through Clinical Development

 

Session 1: Early Stage through Clinical Development (See Q&A here)
Session 1 focuses on early-stage drug through clinical drug development. How can biopharma create a seat at the table for patients and patient advocacy groups? Topics covered include:

  • When is the right time to bring in patients?
  • Patient impact on trial design
  • Examples
  • How to guide
  • Key compliance considerations
  • The long term impact of early relationship building

Session 2: Pre-launch to Launch Commercial Efforts 
Session 2 focuses on pre-launch through commercialization, digging into the strategic and operational elements that need to be in place to incorporate patients during this dynamic timeframe. Topics covered include:

  • Best practices for including patients in prelaunch and launch strategies
  • Two way relationships vs. traditional DTC push campaigns
  • Launch and pre-launch case studies
  • Patient relationships and insurers
  • The impact of technology on patient relationships; social media, mobile and other new channels
  • Metrics for patient programs – it can be done
  • Compliance in patient engagement activities


Session 3: Post Launch through Life Cycle Management

Session 3 focuses on post-launch through the life cycle management of products, looking at the long-term impact patient centricity can have on health outcomes and brand loyalty. Topics covered include:

  • Building strong long-term ongoing relationships
  • Long term impact on adherence
  • Expanding patient relationships into outcomes results
  • How to expand and connect your relationships for future products
  • What happens with relationships post-patent
  • Compliance over the long haul
  • How relationship building stands the test of time

Speakers:
Cheryl Lubbert
President, CEO, and Co-owner
Health Perspectives Group

Pam Garfield
Senior Vice President, Strategy and Innovation
Patient Health Perspectives

Jean McCoy
Senior Vice President, Strategy & Innovation
Health Advocacy Strategies

Participants that will find this webinar most beneficial will be those involved in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Job titles of attendees that will be most applicable for this session will be:

  • Patient Advocacy
  • Patient Education
  • Patient Communications

How to expand and connect your relationships for future products
What happens with relationships post-patent
Compliance over the long haul
How relationship building stands the test of time
Speakers:
Cheryl Lubbert
President, CEO, and Co-owner
Health Perspectives Group
Pam Garfield
Senior Vice President, Strategy and Innovation
Patient Health Perspectives
Jean McCoy
Senior Vice President, Strategy & Innovation
Health Advocacy Strategies
Participants that will find this webinar most beneficial will be those involved in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Job titles of attendees that will be most applicable for this session will be:
Patient Advocacy
Patient Education
Patient Communications

Q1 Productions
500 N. Dearborn, Suite 500 | Chicago IL 60654 | U.S.
Phone 312 822 8100 | Fax 1 312 602 3834


Copyright 2013 Q1 Productions - All Rights Reserved Privacy Policy