2nd Annual Pharmaceutical Portfolio Strategy and Management Conference

May 13-14, 2019 | Philadelphia, PA

Renaissance Philadelphia Airport Hotel

Download AgendaRegister Now

DAY ONE | MONDAY, MAY 13TH

8:00 REGISTRATION & WELCOME COFFEE

8:45 CHAIRPERSON’S OPENING REMARKS

9:00 OPENING ICE BREAKER: TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY TRENDS

 

9:15 KEYNOTE PANEL: DEVELOPING AGILITY IN THE FAST-PACED PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY
Tremendous levels of discovery in the pharmaceutical industry over the past two decades have resulted in extremely high quality products across many therapeutic areas, creating considerable competition as corporations continue to develop products for new indications, resulting in a higher investment in research and development in order to deliver new products to the market. As such, it is imperative that portfolio leaders develop a practical strategy which not only includes a clear roadmap for the future, but also enables agile response to developments in the competitive landscape. Forward-thinking executives are rising to the challenge by building flexibility into portfolio strategy to optimize response to dynamic changes in the industry.

  • Perspectives on current industry challenges
  • Maximizing internal capability for adjustment
  • Applying insights to move forward as an industry

Gina Bilotti, JOHNSON & JOHNSON

Steven Krivicich, HOVIONE

Kelvin Roddy, SERVIER

Bruce Goldberg, LYELL

 

10:00 CASE STUDY: SUPPORTING THE RAPID TRANSITION FROM CANDIDATE TO COMMERCIAL PRODUCT THROUGH RESEARCH ADVANCEMENTS
Executive leadership from throughout the pharmaceutical industry continue to place pressure across the organization in the drive to discover new molecules, validate research findings, and secure regulatory clearance and payer support as rapidly as possible, all within a highly competitive market. In order to meet this mandate from executive leadership teams, portfolio strategy and management teams must consider new methods of research and meet the rapid advancement of products and technology, all while balancing financial and operational resources. Moving away from traditional research and discovery methods into streamlined approaches which leverage machine learning and increase R&D productivity, organizations willing to take the risk of pushing boundaries are leading the industry into a new paradigm.

  • Impact of changing approval processes on portfolio strategy
  • Use of advancements in study and research designs:
    • Synthetic cohorts
    • Seamless trials
  • Benchmarking candidates in disparate research modules

Kelvin Roddy, Program Management Lead – Oncology, SERVIER

 

10:45 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

 

11:15 RISK ASSESSMENT DEEP DIVE: EVALUATING RISKS AGAINST VALUE IN PRODUCT CANDIDATES
While pharmaceutical portfolio management executives provide insight, influence and support on a wide range of decisions, there is perhaps no greater area of importance than in calculating potential risks and weighing this information against the potential commercial value of product candidates. This requires an extreme level of knowledge and skill, where value drivers as well as known and potential risks must each be carefully examined within the context of the level of risk acceptable to the corporation. Quantifying the risk of failure as well as probability of success, translating those risks into quantifiable value and balancing drivers of future innovation with current risk will be discussed in this in-depth presentation.

John Pisnanont, Director, Portfolio & Decision Analysis, PFIZER

 

12:00 EXCHANGE GROUPS: PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF RISK ASSESSMENT IN PORTFOLIO STRATEGY & MANAGEMENT

  • GROUP 1: Strategic portfolio valuation
    Dean Santoro, BIOGEN
  • GROUP 2: Operational project valuation
    Kasia Hopek, GILEAD SCIENCES

 

12:30 LUNCHEON FOR ALL PARTICIPANTS

 

1:45 CASE STUDY: BUILDING & SCALING PMOs: ESTABLISHING INFRASTRUCTURE TO SUPPORT THE DISCIPLINE OF PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT
Despite differing levels of necessity for the establishment and utilization of portfolio management offices based on pharmaceutical company size and number of products, uncertainty remains in organizations of all sizes regarding how and when to build and scale such teams. While identifying and implementing the right software is one component of a successful PMO, software alone cannot support quality prioritization decisions without the coordinated organizational culture, stakeholder sponsorship, and executive support for portfolio goals that can be achieve through an effective portfolio management office.

  • Steps in developing a robust PMO
  • Pitfalls to avoid in PMO formation
  • Scaling the PMO in response to growth

Pik Leng Wong, Senior Director, Global Portfolio Management Office & Operational Excellence, SANOFI

 

2:30 EXCHANGE GROUPS: ACCELERATING PORTFOLIO DECISION MAKING THROUGH ROBUST DECISION ANALYSIS PROCESSES

  • Sharing approaches to project scorecards
  • Considering adjustments to phase-gate processes
  • Best practices in executive milestone review

Aimee Rodrigues, BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM ANIMAL HEALTH

Kinny Trivedi, JANSSEN

 

3:15 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

 

3:45 CO-PRESENTATION: SEAMLESS CROSS-FUNCTIONAL EXECUTION OF A DYNAMIC PORTFOLIO

Dawn Furey, Head of Portfolio Delivery Operations, JANSSEN

Jesse Conard, Sr Director, Head of Project & Portfolio Management, JOHNSON & JOHNSON

 

4:30 GROUP DISCUSSION: DISCONTINUING PRODUCT RESEARCH TO ENHANCE THE STRENGTH OF OVERALL PORTFOLIO & PIPELINE
Across the pharmaceutical industry, corporations face a relatively high rate of product candidates not reaching regulatory approval, with some estimates as high as nine of ten candidates not progressing to the final stages of development. With such high rates of discontinuation, portfolio executives must be keenly attuned to the signals and indicators that projects may not meet the needs of patients and regulators, and consider the amount of time and resources allocated to these candidates. Balancing data collected from clinical research and external literature review against internal perspectives and executive intuition is incredibly difficult, and one which must be mastered by portfolio executives.

  • Signals indicating potential product failure
  • Balancing data & facts against intuition
  • Divesting projects to external partners

Aimee Rodrigues, Head of R&D Resource Capabilities
BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM ANIMAL HEALTH

Anisha Moring, Portfolio Manager
BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM ANIMAL HEALTH

 

5:15 CLOSING REMARKS & DAY 1 CONCLUSION

Download the Agenda

We hope to see you at the conference!

Share This