ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINE MANAGEMENT AND OPTIMIZATION CONFERENCE

APRIL 10-11, 2017 | CHICAGO, IL
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DAY TWO | TUESDAY, APRIL 11TH

8:00 REGISTRATION AND MORNING COFFEE

8:30 APPROACHES TO ACCOUNTABLE CARE: LESSONS LEARNED FROM MOFFITT CANCER CENTER
The transformation of health providers into ACOs has implications on how CMS may assess and pay providers for their services in the future. This development has profound strategic and structural ramifications for providers. Many organizations have already undertaken the changes necessary to take advantage of the incentive payments associated with the impending CMS program. This transition in the healthcare industry has the intent of bending the cost-quality curve, which will require a multitude of drivers beyond the single concept of ACOs. This presentation will profile Moffitt Cancer Center’s path to accounting for the outcomes of care and measuring performance to achieve overall quality and efficiencies in the healthcare industry.

  • Timely and comprehensive data analytics
  • Understanding total cost of care
  • Preparing to enter into new payment models
  • Developing accountable care contracts
  • Bundled payment model discussions

Karen K. Fields, M.D., Medical Director, Clinical Pathways Program and Value-Based Cancer Care
MOFFITT CANCER CENTER

 

9:15 REDUCING VARIATION IN ONCOLOGY CARE DELIVERY
Facing pressure to drive value in service lines, hospital oncology leaders must reduce unnecessary variation to ensure consistent and high-level care across the continuum. Identifying variations in healthcare delivery and utilization can create opportunities to reduce costs and improve value. Aligning patterns of utilization requires hospitals to work productively with physicians in driving variation reduction to achieve the best possible efficiencies and outcomes.

  • Identifying cost outliers in the oncology service line
  • Tools to reduce clinical variation and improve outcomes
  • Engaging physicians to drive operational transformation
  • Results and impact on ROI and patient outcomes

James L. Weese, MD, FACS, Vice President Aurora Cancer Services, Clinical Adjunct Professor of Surgery, UW School of Medicine and Public Health
AURORA HEALTH CARE, INC.

 

10:00 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

 

10:30 ENGAGING PATIENTS & COMMUNITIES THROUGH MARKETING ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINE
With increased competition, a dynamic healthcare market and discerning consumers, it is vital to optimize marketing initiatives to consistently acquire patients and attract physicians for sustained profitability and service line growth. Oncology service lines must plan, develop and implement positioning and branding strategies for effective market penetration to attract and influence current and prospective patients and increase volume. Marketing strategies featuring community outreach, branding, physician marketing, and consumer advertising, must be implemented to successfully differentiate the oncology service line as a high-value provider to secure market share and increase competitiveness.

  • Goals & strategy in marketing oncology service lines
  • Partnerships with community & advocacy relations
  • Initiatives surrounding population health
  • Clinical research and innovation in treatment

Sharon Parker, RN, BSN, MSA, Director Cancer, Neuroscience and Orthopedic Services
GENESIS HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

 

11:15 STREAMLINING ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINE OPERATIONS BY ELIMINATING UNNECESSARY COSTS
A top priority in value-based care delivery is eliminating waste, spending that can be cut without harming patients or reducing quality. Sustainable, high-quality care is only possible through enhancing the patient experience and effectively managing the costs of delivering that care by identity cost-cutting opportunities. Cost controls are increasingly factored into measuring quality of care, and the identification and elimination of inefficiency and unnecessary spending while improving quality is imperative for future oncology service line success. Leveraging an integrated service line approach to reduce waste and improve overall care will enable hospitals to increase ROI, improve efficiency and compete in the market on cost and quality.

  • Reducing administrative redundancies in oncology care
  • Utilization of patient navigators to streamline service
  • Identifying high-cost users of oncology services
  • Creating collaboration with physicians & staff members

Margaret (Peg) O’Grady, Administrative Director, Oncology Service Line
ABINGTON JEFFERSON HEALTH SYSTEM

 

12:30 LUNCHEON FOR ALL CONFERENCE GUESTS

 

1:15 TRENDS SHAPING THE FUTURE OF CANCER CARE & ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINES
In order to continue the dynamic growth of oncology service lines, and further the treatment of all types of cancer, service line administrators must identify trends, capitalize on new opportunities and quickly evolve in order to create a sustainable market position. The development of a strategic plan for short and long-term oncology services will ensure hospitals and health systems are prepared for changes in healthcare delivery resulting from a wide variety of factors including payment reforms, patient preferences and increasingly complex yet highly effective treatment options. Through discussion on key drivers advancing service line growth and the future direction of oncology, participants will reflect on the evolution of oncology service lines while preparing for a dynamic future.

  • Development of an adaptable, future-proof service line strategy
  • Integration of new technologies & therapies into oncology
  • Investing in new quality care measures for the future
  • Models of future oncology care needed by specific communities
  • Patient-centric approaches to service line reorientation

Christine Winn, SVP, MD Anderson Cooper Cancer Institute & Physician Alignment
COOPER UNIVERSITY HEALTH CARE

 

2:00 INTEGRATING A COMMUNITY-ACADEMIC HYBRID MODEL FOR CANCER CARE DELIVERY
This presentation will discuss the creation of a community-academic cancer center mode that offers patients local access to more and earlier-phase clinical trials and better care than they might receive in traditional community settings. These hybrid centers provide oncologists an opportunity to practice medicine and conduct clinical research without some of the bureaucratic constraints inherent an academic setting.

  • Cancer service line development in health systems
  • Quality management programs
  • Community oncology research program implementation

Justin F. Klamerus, MD, MMM, Interim President, Karmanos Cancer Hospital, VP, Chief Quality Officer
KARMANOS CANCER INSTITUTE

 

2:45 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

 

3:00 CASE STUDY ONCOLOGY CARE MODEL: THE JOURNEY AND HOW THE FUTURE MIGHT LOOK
This presentation will examine one hospitals decision to apply for participation in the Oncology Care Model (OCC) based on questionable sustainability of the FFS (Fee For Service) model and increased pressure from payers regarding use of drugs. Facing and overcoming the challenges since acceptance into the program, including information assimilation and resource management, indications of the future for value based payment models will also be covered.

  • Emphasis on care coordination and quality
  • The future of the OCM program
  • Segway into Oncology Medical Home

Kari Young, Executive Administrator, HEMATOLOGY ONCOLOGY ASSOCIATES, PC

 

3:45 CASE STUDY: ENHANCING THE QUALITY OF CARE FOR PATIENTS RECEIVING ORAL CHEMOTHERAPY AND IMPROVE NURSE ONCOLOGY SATISFACTION THROUGH PROCESS IMPROVEMENT
A rising number of chemotherapy medications are being given orally causing nurses to be increasingly challenged with effectively and efficiently monitoring patient compliance to medication regimens, maintaining a plan of care, and navigating patients through a continuum of care. Outpatient oncology nurses voiced concerns regarding current processes and identified the greatest concerns: ineffective communication, lack of quality patient education, patient cost, patient and staff safety and enough dedicated staff.

  • Identifying current process waste areas
  • The impact and effort required for improvement
  • Developing an action plan

Sally Acton, RN, BSN, OCN, MSM, Dir. of Cancer and Palliative Care Services
SCHNECK MEDICAL CENTER

 

4:30 INTEGRATION OF SURVIVORSHIP CARE PROGRAMMING INTO ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINES
According to the American Cancer Society, there were a record 15.5 million U.S. survivors of cancer in 2016, more individuals are surviving cancer than ever before, a testament to greater detection and treatment of this disease. However, for many patients, the arrival of remission does not equate to the conclusion of services, and the post-treatment phase is a unique and equally important part of overall care. Beyond meeting the Commission for Cancer Care requirements for providing survivorship care plans, many hospitals are now investing in survivorship programs as a way to improve patient satisfaction and ongoing health.

  • Models for screening & long-term follow-up care
  • Survivorship as a distinct phase of cancer care
  • Quality measures in survivorship & enhanced QoL
  • Efficiencies in treatment summaries & care plans

Susan J. Brown, PhD, RN, Executive Director, Oncology Service Line, MERCY HEALTH

 

5:15 PROGRAM CONCLUSION