6th Annual Customer Centric Medical Information Conference

July 30-31, 2019 | Boston, MA

Doubletree Suites by Hilton Boston - Cambridge

Download AgendaRegister Now

DAY TWO | WEDNESDAY, JULY 31

8:30 REGISTRATION & WELCOME COFFEE

8:55 OPENING REMARKS

9:00-10:30 ANALYTICS MODULE: DEVELOPMENT OF INSIGHTFUL METRICS TO SHOWCASE EFFECTIVENESS OF RESPONSES

9:00 CASE STUDY: SHOWCASING ANALYTICAL PROCESSES TO PROVIDE ACTIONABLE INSIGHTS TO INTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS
The value of analytical data for reviewing MI team performance and providing support for internal budget justifications has been a mainstay for many medical information executives. However, as the medical information role becomes more automated and teams have increased access to different data, the question becomes how to best utilize analytical processes to improved end-user engagement and responses. The ability of AI tools has increased the potential processing speed and data access points for many analytical studies and medical information teams are exploring how to best advance these operations by accurately focusing metrics and launching pull through strategies to turn analytical insights into internal change.

  • Exploring integration of AI tools
    • Cost vs. results
    • Timelines considerations
  • Transitioning data results into actions
  • Framing questions for analytical review

Valerie T Brown, Knowledge Centered Capabilities, Analytics Consultant – Diabetes,
Global Customer Information and Support,
ELI LILLY AND COMPANY

 

9:45 PART TWO: SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS: OVERCOMING CHALLENGES IN DATA MINING WITH AUTOMATED TOOLS AND DATABASES
The foundation for successful metrics and benchmarking algorithms is to have comprehensive data mining processes in place that take into account the variety of applicable information sources. With the increased focus on implementing automated data collection systems, medical information executives continue to face challenges surrounding how to ensure the correct information is being referenced. These facilitated discussions will provide participants with an opportunity to delve into sharing best practices and lessons learned regarding the establishment of data mining parameters for different medical information analyses. Topics of Discussion Include:

  • Data mining free text fields
  • Impact of translations
  • Data sources beyond the database

FACILITATORS:
Valerie T Brown, ELI LILLY AND COMPANY

Erica Dankiewicz, PharmD, ACORDA THERAPEUTICS

 

10:30 COFFEE AND NETWORKING BREAK

 

Polling Question: Do you currently work with automated tools such as live chat?

 

11:00 THE FRONT LINE: EQUIPPING CALL CENTERS TO BE EFFECTIVE & CONSISTENT SOURCES OF MEDICAL INFORMATION
As the first point of contact for unsolicited requests, call centers must utilize the full range of standard response information to answer requests satisfactorily and consistently, while correctly triaging elevated issues. Proactive and continual collaboration between the call center and other medical information personnel is necessary to ensure that customer and end-user feedback is quickly incorporated into future responses, and to keep call center personnel fully informed on the materials at their disposal. A well-trained call center operating in harmony with the wider medical information team can provide timely, relevant responses to patient and HCP requests with a high degree of precision.

  • Providing call centers with clear and easily accessible response data
  • Training call center reps regarding parameters for inquiry escalation
  • Gap analysis: Determining areas of need within call center responses

Michelle Zachman, Associate Director, Medical Information/Communication/Education
UPSHER-SMITH LABORATORIES

Kari Johnson, Associate Director, Medical Information, ALKERMES

 

11:45 PANEL: INTEGRATION OF PATIENT CENTRICITY INTO MEDICAL INFORMATION INQUIRY RESPONSES
The evolution of patient centricity has grown, having influence in many of the operations within life science organizations as patients are requesting more transparency and access to medical and product data. As patients become more proactive in researching disease states and product efficacy and safety data, MI teams have concurrently explored strategies for creating informational response packages and delivery channels targeted for non-HCPs. It is essential for medical information executives to ensure that patients have ease of access to needed materials and that responses are clearly understandable without sacrificing the inclusion of all medically relevant details.

Maureen Bot, AMGEN

James Sterchele, GLAXOSMITHKLINE

Chris Keenan, BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB

 

12:30 LUNCHEON FOR ALL SPEAKERS, SPONSORS & ATTENDEES

 

1:45 CASE STUDY: STRATEGIES FOR COMPILING FEEDBACK REGARDING INQUIRY RESPONSE MATERIALS
The production of exemplary response materials is a central component to medical information, and constructive feedback regarding MI resources is essential for refining and reframing response packages. As HCPs and patients seek timely and targeted responses, MI teams must find ways to collect feedback that assesses the effectiveness and timeliness of informational pieces and delivery channels. Successful evaluation methods must balance ease of completion and the opportunity to provide detailed feedback to ensure valuable data is collected for use in crafting future materials.

  • Creating surveys that gather useable information
  • Optimal time window for peak survey completion
  • Benefits and drawbacks of various survey methods
    • IVR and automation
    • Mail and email
    • Directly administered surveys
  • Analyzing the data collected from completed surveys

Susan Wnorowski, Director, US Medical Information, IPSEN

Jason Bradt, MD, Head of Innovation and Strategy, Medical Affairs, IPSEN

 

2:15 SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION: NAVIGATING MI CHALLENGES BASED ON COMPANY SIZE & RESOURCE ALLOCATION
Medical information executives face a plethora of organizational, compliance, and budgetary hurdles throughout a products lifecycle and the implementable solutions can vary dependent on an organizations size and available resources. As pipelines and products continue to become more complex, the challenges associated with medical information request grows. This group discussion allows attendees an opportunity to engage with industry colleagues facing similar medical information and response management challenges and provides executives with a unique opportunity for insights from varied individuals and corporations.

GROUP ONE: Small sized organizations – Kristen Mosdell, DERMIRA

GROUP TWO: Mid-sized organizations – Jully Kim, CELGENE

GROUP THREE: Large organizations – Jose Argueta, ASTRAZENECA

 

3:00 END OF CONFERENCE