11TH ANNUAL MEDICAL DEVICE CLINICAL TRAINING AND EDUCATION CONFERENCE

FEBRUARY 22-23, 2018 | PHOENIX, AZ

POINTE HILTON TAPATIO CLIFFS RESORT

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DAY TWO | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23

GRANDE BALLROOM C & D

8:00 REGISTRATION AND MORNING COFFEE

8:20 CHAIRPERSONS OPENING REMARKS

8:30 EXPANDING THE REACH OF A COMPREHENSIVE RESIDENCY AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM
Partnerships with residency and fellowships provide long term growth opportunities for Medical Device companies through developed relationships that prosper throughout an HPC’s career. These relations require a commitment to an established program that includes refined goals, extensive and continuous development, and buy-in from residencies and fellows, as well as internal leadership and sales teams. By maintaining a prosperous residency and fellowship program, clinical trainers can establish pathways of integrating products more easily into new markets, while increasing ROI of the time and effort put into developing their residents.

  • Coordination of clinical education and sales teams for relationship building
  • Diverse and continuous engagement strategies for relationship development
  • Learning tools for differences in experience, generation and learning styles

Chad Rains, RN, BSN, MBA-HCM, Sr. Director of Professional Education, ORTHALIGN, INC.

 

9:15 GROUP DISCUSSION: HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL LEARNER PERSPECTIVES AND FEEDBACK ON CLINICAL EDUCATION
While clinical trainers consistently gather feedback from healthcare professionals during courses and subsequent to course completion, there is often a level of ambiguity in the data, with medical device professionals unsure of how to effectively translate feedback into actionable changes in format and delivery. Having an opportunity for direct dialogue with healthcare professionals on course format and styles that are most effective in a formal setting entirely focused on improving clinical training is a singular opportunity for executives. With a focus on honest dialogue with healthcare professional training participants, clinical trainers will gain greater insight into the drivers behind continued education, effective strategies for engaging with HCPs as well as insights into learner retention.

  • Drivers for participation in continued education programs
  • Relevance of Continued Medical Education accreditation
  • Varied learner objectives in course participation
  • Best practices in presentation and training delivery
  • Methods for increasing retention of material delivered

Panelists:
Board of Directors, National Association of Hispanic Nurses – Phoenix Chapter
Joseth Hermosillo, BSN, RN

Rose Lopez, BSN, RN

Lyda Velez, MSN, RN

Veronica Vital PhD, RN

 

10:30 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

KOL MODULE: ELEVATING ENGAGEMENT & DELIVERY OF CLINICAL TRAINING
Clinical Education executives rely on the depth of knowledge, expertise and reputation of key opinion leaders, who are engaged to lead training programs for physicians, surgical staff and healthcare professionals in order to ensure the safe and correct use of new and existing medical technologies. In a dynamic and competitive field, building a robust strategy for engaging KOLs and aligning materials delivered by thought leaders with corporate messaging and goals is of great importance.

10:30 ENSURING KOL CLINICAL EDUCATION COMMITMENT AND ENGAGEMENT

  • Differentiating KOLs, champions, KELs and thought leaders
  • Methods for identifying and vetting potential KOLs
    • Skills & attributes needed in effective KOLs
    • Use of sales & commercial teams in identification
    • Alternative sources for identifying KOLs
  • KOL’s perspective on engaging with Medical Device Firms

Ronald Morton, Vice President, Clinical Science, BOSTON SCIENTIFIC

 

11:00 CASE STUDY: MANAGING CORPORATE AND KOL MESSAGE

  • Incorporating company ethos into KOL clinical training
  • Defining presentation goals for KOL presentation delivery
  • Pros and cons of corporations developing materials vs speakers
  • Assisting KOL speakers in modifying presentation materials
  • Ensuring FDA compliance of prohibiting “off label” discussions

Tony Troncale, PA, MHS, MBA, VP, Global Medical Education, K2M, INC.

 

11:30 SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION: LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Defining metrics and ROI of KOL led training programs
  • Ensuring KOL training in alignment with company message
  • Establishing program engagement and relationship building

 

EAST COURTYARD

12:00 LUNCHEON FOR ALL CONFERENCE GUESTS

 

GRANDE BALLROOM C & D

1:00 LEVERAGING POWERPOINT TO CREATE ENGAGING PRESENTATION AIDES THAT SUPPORT PRESENTATION DELIVERY
When creating a presentation for delivery to healthcare professionals, internal trainees and other executives, the most commonly utilized support tool is Microsoft’s PowerPoint and while PowerPoint is an incredibly useful tool, with high levels of ease of use and near universal compatibility, it is often deployed in an ineffective manner, with high amounts of text on each slide, and low levels of readability, resulting in presentations that are difficult to follow and low on engagement. Training professionals on how to use this powerful tool as an aide, rather than the presentation itself, will ensure the presentation slides act as an aide, supporting the narrative, providing structure and framework in a way that enhances the overall engagement and delivery of the presentation, conveying core concepts and maintaining adherence to the message.

  • Focusing on clarity and less is more concepts for text
  • Changing the mindset to PowerPoint as support tool
  • Aligning slide materials with presentation execution
  • Creating effective and thoughtful presentation narratives

Linda Otis, Senior Training Manager, TELEFLEX MEDICAL – VASCULAR

 

1:30 EFFECTIVE APPROACHES TO BRIDGING GENERATIONAL LEARNING STYLES IN TRAINING & EDUCATION
Medical device commercial teams include executives with diverse experiences and backgrounds, representative of a range of generations including Boomers, Gen X, Millennials and soon, the Post-Millennial Generation Z, which requires an adaptive approach by trainers to ensure materials and methods meet the learning styles and engagement methods preferred by each. With much to learn from each other, forward-thinking organizations leverage the variance in learning styles and engagement methods to improve training and increase retention for all trainees. While representing different stages of career development, there is much that can be gained from examining learning styles and goals of each generation, leveraging the combined benefits of all in order to move organizations forward.

  • Evolution of generational learning and development
  • Building curriculum to adapt to diverse learning styles
  • Strategies and resources for effective adult-learning

Marcia Bauman, RN, MSN, MBA, Director, Clinical Education and Program Development
SAGE PRODUCTS, LLC

 

2:15 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

 

2:30 INTEGRATION OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE TRAINING INTO MEDICAL DEVICE ADULT EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT
Emotional Intelligence first gained popularity when highlighted by Daniel Goleman, in his best-selling novel, Emotional Intelligence – Why it can matter more than IQ, and is now a training foundation for effective communication, used by trainers and educators across various industries. While Emotional Intelligence (EI) focuses the ability to recognize and label emotions, and use this information to guide thinking in order to achieve one’s goals, many medical device trainers and educators see it as a way to effectively educate internal and external stakeholders on complex conversations, enabling quick and well thought out responses. This workshop will highlight the four pillars of Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence model, and provide insight on how medical device sales trainers can effectively incorporate Emotional Intelligence into training programs and curriculum.

Laura Rand, Director, Sales Development, STRYKER

 

3:15 APPLYING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING TECHNIQUES FOR EFFECTIVE AND INNOVATIVE ADULT EDUCATION
Maintaining engagement while training new skill sets, sharing product knowledge, and continuing development is a primary challenge for medical device trainers and educators. While some information is more easily shared with materials or online resources, many trainers and educators are looking for ways to make trainings an engaging and interactive space for knowledge sharing and skills development. Training and education programs utilizing experiential learning strategies and methodologies notice a significant difference in participation and retention. This case study will walk through the process of developing experiential learning in adult education programming from a medical device industry leader, giving attendees an opportunity to practice and participate in an interactive workshop.

  • Shaping curriculum for appropriate experiential learning
  • Utilizing existing time and resources for effective training
  • Development process for building engaging activities

Sally Le, Sales Training Manager, STRYKER

 

4:45 PROGRAM CONCLUSION

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