Semi-Annual Medical Device Clinical Training & Education Conference

March 31 – April 1, 2020 | San Diego, CA

May 12-13, 2020 | Charlotte, NC

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DAY TWO | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1

8:30 REGISTRATION & WELCOME COFFEE

8:50 CHAIRPERSON’S OPENING REMARKS

9:00 RESEARCH INTO FUTURE GROWTH AND HOW COMPANIES ARE PREPARING FOR AN INCREASED ENTRY OF PHYSICIANS
As operating room availability was reduced to a maximum of 80 hours per week for residents, trainees will now spend less time in hospitals in a hands-on setting, escalating the importance of a strong residents program within medical device companies. Training requirements in the classroom are aligning with the decreased accessibility in hospitals by providing additional preparation with a robust plan that accounts for the discrepancy through lenient schedules, hands-on approaches, and access to web-based materials for 24/7 support. Providing support in the courses being offered, clinical trainers can leverage the limited learning time in the field with exposure and practical skills to incoming physicians who require or need extra practice.

Rachel Edwards, Director of Medical Education, ACUMED

 

9:45 PANEL DISCUSSION: KEY METRICS TO CONSIDER WHEN MEASURING TRAINING PROGRAM SUCCESS
The value of educational programs implemented within the market today need quantifiable results, as successful curriculums can provide medical device companies with improved trainee registration and turnout, as well as increased internal support to manage courses and develop content further. Whether training is assessed by engagement, attendance, or post-event feedback, clinical trainers need to motivate internal stakeholders and provide reports that define the effectiveness of training to obtain and increase executive buy-in. Through a panel discussion, attendees will define the key metrics currently implemented internally to measure the company’s ROI, as well as other benchmarks currently being employed throughout the market to increase the allocation of budget.

  • Identifying what motivates executive leadership
  • Key metrics for showcasing benefits of training
  • Performance results and feedback from trainees

PANELISTS:
Rachel Edwards, ACUMED

Sarah Moore, STRYKER

Liz Karen, EDWARDS LIFESCIENCES

Emilie Labud, ZIMMER BIOMET

 

10:45 COFFEE AND NETWORKING BREAK

 

11:15 SMALL GROUP DISCUSSIONS: CREATING A LOW-BUDGET, HIGH-IMPACT TRAINING PROGRAM BY COMPANY SIZE
With business needs constantly evolving and technology advancing, medical device companies are constantly reassessing how training dollars are spent, whether resources are restricted for new investment in technology or necessities such as staff. Clinical educators are creatively utilizing every potential means of support, as well as reviewing budget-friendly applications that can enhance the level of engagement in training without requiring substantial investment, by focusing on approaches that are both effective and cost less to increase the return companies are getting for their learning investment. As budgets are dependent on the size of the company, attendees will break up into groups based on employee size to focus on trends and challenges educators face when determining where to spend training dollars.

  • GROUP 1: Large organizations (5,000-plus employees)
    Sarah Moore, STRYKER
  • GROUP 2: Mid-size organizations (500-4,999 employees)
  • GROUP 3: Small organizations (Less than 500 employees)

 

12:00 LUNCHEON FOR ALL PARTICIPANTS

 

1:00 ENGAGING RESIDENTS & FELLOWS IN EARLY LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT LONG-TERM PRODUCT EXCELLENCE
Clinical leaders are actively engaged in quality, safety evaluation, and program development to improve how HCP’s practice high quality, safe and cost-effective medicine and as such, are creating opportunities within fellowship & residency programs to promote skills and provide flexibility early on. By initiating partnerships through early-stage educational programs, trainers can introduce HCPs to medical products early and provide more in-depth long term training. The fellowship & residency trainings provide clinical trainers with the ability to track the progress of young learners to build out innovative educational spaces that will guide and assess future leaders in the health profession.

Tim Lew, Clinical Education, AXOGEN, INC.

Paula Otto, Professional Education Manager, AXOGEN INC.

 

1:45 LEVERAGING SOCIAL NETWORKS TO ENGAGE HCP’S IN TRAINING & BUILD COMMUNITIES WITHIN THE HEALTHCARE SPACE
Many social media tools are available to HCPs including networking platforms, blogs, and media-sharing sites, making online groups an additional space to generate an open and ongoing interaction with trainees. With the creation of an online community, clinical educators can provide on-demand engagement, instituting a group dynamic to the training and asserting ongoing interactions from trainer to HCP and trainee to trainee. Providing an additional resource for collaboration permits trainers to provide supplementary educational materials, keep up with current trends, device usage, and safety techniques, offering a casual approach to not only follow up with health executives, but to have continuous engagement with new information and device updates.

Michele McKinley, Clinical Educator, STERIS CORPORATION

 

2:30 CASE STUDY: CRAFTING A CLINICAL TRAINING AND EDUCATION PROGRAM ON A BUDGET
As clinical trainers look to integrate new tools, technology, up-to-date labs and highly accessible training for healthcare professionals, securing an adequate budget to support engaging and educational programming is a continued challenge. Whether the budget for device and product training is large or small, clinical training executives need to maximize the investment through creative outlets while tapping into existing internal resources. Identifying ways in which a clinical training course was developed with restricted means will provide participants with an opportunity to view innovative solutions to overcoming budgetary restraints.

  • Managing expectations of training with budget restrictions
  • Maximizing education with minimal resources and tools
  • Heightening attendee experiences & engagement
  • Internal team collaboration to make the most of education

Steve Nagy, Medical Education Manager, TERUMO MEDICAL

 

3:15 EFFECTIVE POST-TRAINING FOLLOW UP TO REINFORCE MESSAGING & IMPROVE OVERALL RETENTION RATES
Although program design, trainee characteristics, and the workplace environment are all a part of the framework used in ensuring comprehension of the educational material, it is the training follow up process that will indicate the success rate of the training itself. The follow-up process is an important step in evaluating trainees and determining if the techniques used were engaging and if the material was comprehensible, confirming whether the training program has the right messaging and the appropriate methodologies in place for the material. Recognizing the constraints and obstacles each learning platform encounters allows clinical trainers the ability to add in techniques such as follow up tests, supplementary educational materials, and online communities to further engage the audience.

  • Comparing pre & post quizzes to evaluate performance
  • Trainee follow-up plans competency examination
  • Changes in practices post-training & behavioral changes

Greg Lightbourn, Global Professional Education Manager, JOHNSON & JOHNSON

 

4:00 END OF CONFERENCE

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