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7th Semi-Annual Medical Device Clinical Training and Education Conference

March 14-15, 2016 | Charlotte, NC

DAY ONE | DAY TWO

DAY ONE

7:45 REGISTRATION & MORNING COFFEE

8:15 WELCOME & CHAIRPERSONS OPENING
David Kamlan, Manager, Clinical Education & Training
ZOLL MEDICAL

8:30 DEMONSTRATING THE VALUE OF CLINICAL TRAINING: PROVING IMPACT ON THE BOTTOM LINE

  • Linking customer retention and revenue to clinical training
  • Utilizing data to justify training costs to internal management
  • ROI vs return on experience: Areas of training to measure

KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM CASE STUDY:

  • Metrics and analytics used to evaluate and establish ROI
  • Tools used to capture the analytics needed to support clinical training
  • Ideas on a model where clinical education can drive business

Jason D. Gwilliam, Senior Manager Physician Education and Training, Vascular Intervention
SPECTRANETICS

 

9:15 UNDERSTANDING THE EXPECTATIONS AND UNIQUE NEEDS OF THE CUSTOMER
In order to increase revenue and market share, medical device corporations must align products and services with the needs of healthcare professionals to improve patient outcomes and retain business, which requires deep analysis and understanding of client requirements in a constantly evolving healthcare setting. To deliver the highest level of customer care, device corporations must exceed expectations of products delivered, anticipating the requirements of partners and positioning products and services to best maximize time and resources in the healthcare setting. This high level discussion will cover best practices and lessons learned in tailoring clinical training in a way that provides effective training and education where and when required.

  • Encompassing the end users point of view
  • Collect and analyze data on end user behaviors
  • Surveying customers on preferred learning methods
  • Assess end-user demographic
  • Establishing expectations prior to training

Marshall Wisoff, Director, Clinical & Educational Services, CONMED

 

10:00 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

 

10:30 USING CLINICAL EVIDENCE TO TRAIN HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS AND SECURE ENDUSER BUY-IN

  • Effectively positioning clinical data in training course
  • Alternative positioning when clinical data is scarce
  • Integrating clinical data into training materials
  • Tips for communicating clinical evidence to HCPs
  • Building confidence and buy-in of the device with data

 

11:15 ZOLL CASE STUDY: UTILIZING THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE TO IDENTIFY AND DRIVE INITIAL AND ONGOING TRAINING INITIATIVES

  • Tools for collecting and aggregating dynamic customer feedback
  • The analytics of diverse intel streams
  • Harnessing data to drive revisions of training content and methods
  • Hansei: don’t learn from experience, learn from reflecting on experience
  • Applying serial analytics to ensure current issues and trends are addressed

David Kamlan, Manager, Clinical Education & Training, ZOLL MEDICAL

 

12:00 LUNCHEON FOR ALL SPEAKERS, SPONSORS & ATTENDEES

 

1:15 PANEL: BUILDING EARLY RELATIONSHIPS WITH FELLOWS TO TRAIN THE NEXT GENERATION OF PHYSICIANS

  • Partnership opportunities with academic medical centers on training
  • Using a fellow’s thirst for knowledge to drive clinical training
  • Developing training & learning tools for a new generation of HCPs
    • Gamification
    • Virtual classroom
    • Social media and online outlets
  • Investing in a long-term training strategy with fellows
  • Metric used to evaluate ROI of fellow training

Steve Erickson, BOSTON SCIENTIFIC

Jason D. Gwilliam, SPECTRANETICS

Samuel Kim, TEARSCIENCE, INC

Greg Prevatt, APOLLO ENDOSURGERY

William Lewandowski, 3D SYSTEMS HEALTHCARE

 

2:00 CASE STUDY: UTILIZING ADULT LEARNING AS THE FOUNDATION FOR CLINICAL EDUCATION

  • Real-time example of integrating adult learning into training program
    • Analyze unique end-user learning style
    • Combine visual, auditory, and learning approaches
    • Methods & materials most appropriate for adult learner
  • Active learning to enhance recall, synthesis & problem-solving
  • Adult-learning principles that encompass change

KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM CASE STUDY:

  • Adult learning methods most appropriate for clinical training
    • Models to appeal to varied levels
    • Tools for assessing trainees prior to a course
    • Engaging and motivating learners for success
  • Measuring the impact of adult learning methods on training
  • Processes for matching the appropriate level and competency

Harold I. Magazine, PhD, Director of Education and Training, TELEFLEX

 

2:45 COFFEE & NETWORKING BREAK

 

3:15 PHILIPS CASE STUDY: PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF ADULT LEARNING METHODOLOGIES

Terri Bennett, Senior Manager, Clinical Sales Support
PHILIPS HEALTHCARE

 

4:00 SMITH & NEPHEW CASE STUDY: PROMOTING SAFE USE  OF MEDICAL DEVICES IN LATIN AMERICAN THROUGH CLINICAL TRAINING

  • Establishing communication between education & commercial departments
  • Driving innovation in medical education in Latin America
  • Online medical education: Adapting to the needs of different physicians
  • The core of education: Incorporating this concept in the medical device space
  • Latin America results in medical education projects: Smith & Nephew experience

Rogerio Teixeira DaSilva MD, PhD, Director Professional Education LATAM
SMITH & NEPHEW

 

END-USER BREAKOUT SESSIONS

4:45 ENSURING RELEVANCE OF CLINICAL EDUCATION FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS
Conference attendees will break into groups to discuss best practices and lessons learned in creating clinical training courses for specific healthcare professionals. The end user breakout sessions will be facilitated by speakers and conference attendees from medical device organizations. The topics for discussion may include but are but are not limited to: Surgeon/OR, Non-Surgeon Physician, Nurse, EMT, Physician Assistant, Radiological Technician, Fellow/Resident, KOL etc.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Ensuring highest level of training relevance and applicability
  • Liaise with end-user to understand training needs and preferences
  • Create adaptable training materials that meet requests end user
  • Maximizing feedback from HCP sources on training
  • Measure the effectiveness of training on target end-users

 

5:30 CLOSING REMARKS AND DAY ONE CONCLUSION

 

DAY ONE | DAY TWO

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